MIKO M. WILFORD

Assistant Professor

I am a tenure-track Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. I am interested in applying what we know about social-cognitive phenomena to the improvement of real world procedures, particularly law and education. To this end, I am the P.I. of the Applied Cognition Research Lab, and my most significant current project (funded by an NSF CAREER grant) is the development of computer-simulation software with which to study plea decision-making.

 
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TEACHING

Cognitive Psychology (Fall 2019)

Psych. of Decision-Making (Spring 2020)

Advanced Cognition (Spring 2019)

Psychology and Law (Spring 2020)

 

CURRENT PROJECTS

Programs of Study

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PLEA DECISION-MAKING

What leads an innocent person to plead guilty?

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EYEWITNESS MEMORY

How do well-intentioned witnesses contribute to wrongful convictions?

TASK-SWITCHING

A dark side to interpolated testing?

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LECTURER FLUENCY

How do "good" lecturers impact student learning?

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Selected Publications

Click the "CV" header to download my CV!

LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

Smith, A. M., Wilford, M. M., Wells, G. L., & Quigley-McBride, A. (2019). Mistaken eyewitness identification rates increase when either witnessing or testing conditions get worse. Law and Human Behavior43(4), doi: 10.1037/lhb0000334

PSYCHOLOGY, PUBLIC POLICY, AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., & Redlich, A. D. (2018). Deciphering the guilty plea: Where research can inform policy [Introduction to the special section on Guilty Pleas]. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 24(2), 145-146. doi: 10.1037/law0000169

PSYCHOLOGY, PUBLIC POLICY AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., & Wells, G. L. (2018). Bluffed by the dealer: Distinguishing false pleas from false confessions [Special section on Guilty Pleas]. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 24(2), 158-170. doi: 10.1037/law0000165

PSYCHOLOGY, CRIME AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., Van Horn, M. C.,* Penrod, S. D., & Greathouse, S. M. (2018). Not separate but equal? The impact of multiple-defendant trials on juror decision-making. Psychology, Crime and Law, 24(1), 14-37. doi: 10.1080/1068316X.2017.1351969

JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: APPLIED

Wilford, M. M., Chan, J. C. K., & Tuhn, S. J.* (2014). Retrieval enhances eyewitness suggestibility to misinformation in free and cued recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 28, 81-93. doi: 10.1037/xap0000001

PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN AND REVIEW

Carpenter, S. K., Wilford, M. M., Kornell, N., & Mullaney, K. M. (2013). Appearances can be deceiving: Instructor fluency increases perception of learning without increasing actual learning. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 20, 1350-1356. doi: 10.3758/s13423-013-0442-z

JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN MEMORY AND COGNITION

Wells, G. L., Wilford, M. M., & Smalarz, L. (2013). Forensic science testing: The forensic filler-control method for controlling contextual bias, estimating error rates, and calibrating analysts' reports. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 2, 53-55. doi: 10.1016/j.jarmac.2013.01.004

JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE

Chan, J. C. K., Wilford, M. M., & Hughes, K. L.* (2012). Retrieval can increase or decrease suggestibility depending on how memory is tested: The importance of source complexity. Journal of Memory and Language, 67, 78-85. doi: 10.1016/j.jml.2012.02.006

PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Wilford, M. M., & Wells, G. L. (2010). Does facial processing prioritize change detection? Change-blindness illustrates costs and benefits of holistic processing. Psychological Science, 21, 1611-1615. doi: 10.1177/0956797610385952

 

EDUCATION

PH.D., IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

August 2012 - July 2014

I have a Ph.D. in Psychology, and I was co-advised by Dr. Gary L. Wells (in the Social Psychology program) and Dr. Jason C. K. Chan (in the Cognitive Psychology program). I was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. My dissertation was entitled, "Bluffed by the dealer: Distinguishing false pleas from false confessions".

M.A., IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

August 2009 - May 2012

I have a Master's degree in Psychology and I was co-advised by Dr. Gary L. Wells (in the Social Psychology program) and Dr. Jason C. K. Chan (in the Cognitive Psychology program). I was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. My thesis was entitled, "Let's make a deal: Exploring plea acceptance rates in the guilty and the innocent".

B.S. & B.A., IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

August 2005 - May 2009

I have a B.S. is in Psychology and a B.A. in Political Science. I also earned a Minor in Applied Statistics and graduated Magna Cum Laude. I completed an Honors thesis under the advisement of Michelle L. Stock and Meg Gerrard entitled, "Changing binge-drinking cognitions: The impact of mode of processing, comparison targets and past behavior".

 
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"It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer"

William Blackstone

 

CONTACT ME

 

(978) 934-3975

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